The transition has to happen at some point, and it's better if you're there when it happens. Life is full of all of that, and most of it doesn't haunt you forever.You make it sound like I said, "No computers, no internet, no cameras, nothing! Kids and smartphones though, it's just a bad combination.Yeah, I'm the same age, and I had a really hard time even understanding this article. Does this article claim those expectations are being violated? Guess it's time to buy a porch and a rocking chair.

Chatbot kissing and sex-66Chatbot kissing and sex-85Chatbot kissing and sex-18

Then you have this kind of endemic bullshit: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?

id=13930707I don't agree with this, because it's just like the normal helicopter parenting of refusing to let your kids play outside / be exposed to dirt / have bicycles / take risks etc; what happens when they grow up?

That's a nice way to get your child ostracised by the group.

Once a teen leaves elementary not having a smartphone (specifically Android or IOS) is the kiss of death in this modern age.

I am fairly pessimistic about the way smartphones are invading our lives.

And personally, I own a smartphone that doesn't even run most 'apps', because it isn't an Android or IOS smartphone — and I am fine with that, because I can handle the consequences (such as they are).

Because a lot can be determined with a picture of a face.(age, race, and sex) If their goal is targeted advertising(which it is)this info is automatically filled out vs voluntary submission. It's calling you a fool for sending something that isn't a pic.

The way I understood it it's also telling you to take a pic from the in-app keyboard but I haven't actually tried it so I can't confirm this. What expectations would a user have for how their data will be used given that context?

Are you able to actually decline it, or is a picture with a face a requirement?