Maybe staying in with your significant other tonight instead of going out with your buddies could have long-term benefits -- call it a hunch.

However, while sites like e Harmony and Match are quick to espouse their success rates (the former claims that 438 members marry every day) it turns out their data, much like OKCupid, might not be telling the whole truth.

A recent joint-study (PDF) conducted by Michigan State University and Stanford found that people who met online weren't as likely to stay together for the long haul as their offline-matched counterparts.

Their avatar wedding occurred eight months earlier, however.

While sitting together on the couch in their physical living room, they recited their vows in front of hundreds of cyberfriends in an extravagant Utherverse ceremony complete with a long dress, hired DJ and elaborate decorations.

Of the 912 MMORPG players from 45 different countries who were polled, 42 percent of female and 26 percent of male players admitted that they were attracted to other players they met as avatars.

But the Riselings and many other couples have found that their avatar attraction extended far beyond the computer screen.

Online dating has reached the point where it isn't weird to say you met someone via the internet anymore.

Tinder is another story, but that's a digression for a different day.

Pushed together by mutual friends, the two instantly hit it off and a few dances (plus a couple rounds of body shots) later, they went home together.