My rule of thumb is to suggest meeting after about 10 messages.

Or at least, that's where he said he worked, and who am I to doubt him?

(uniformdating.com) Plenty of Fish I took an interest in Po F because a friend of mine was dating a guy she had met on there, and you don't have to register to "window-shop", as it were.

But if that's your cup of tea, great, and I'd certainly recommend it for its in-depth filtering system, a series of questionaires that narrow down your search in a realistic and practical way.

(okcupid.com) Match This is where people go to get married, if you believe the ads, and you have to be pretty serious if you're going to stump up the £30 monthly fee (cheaper if you commit to three or six months).

I didn't get married after my experiences with Match, but I did learn an important lesson: an awful lot of people are deceptively attractive from a distance.

One fella I dated for a few weeks seemed to have it all going on; he had a briefcase and a job which occassionally requred him to commute to Burgess Hill, so I was pretty sure that he was a full-blown adult.

e Harmony e Harmony claims to be "responsible for nearly 4% of new U. marriages" and scores well in surveys of online dating sites, if you're the sort of person who believes surveys.

This is a serious site for serious (I didn't say desperate) singles - and you'd better be serious to fork out £45 for a month's membership (although reviewing your matches is free).

You don't need to be as popular as Harry Styles, just fairly sociable.

People will always take great delight in ramping up the exciting aspects of their lifestyle.

It's very easy to pretend to be someone you're not, or over-hype who you really are.