Some early doulton ware also has an impressed date mark making it easy to date, eg 11.40 would mean production date of november 1940.You may have also seen the bunnykins stamp without colouring, just a black outline in monochrome.These pieces are also generally rare, highly valued and sought after by collectors.

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Early examples from 1934-1937 may just have the Royal Doulton backstamp on its own with a number next to it, or just the word “bunnykins” below. The registered trademark, R in the circle was added below the bunny’s and dates the piece to between 19 on earthenware. This backstamp is usually found after 1967, English Bone China was added as earthenware was dropped in favour of bone china. People often make the mistake of thinking because it has the date 1936 on it that this is when the item dates to.

An impressed date mark was also used on early Royal Doulton ware, which makes the piece easy to date – eg 9.39 denotes a production date of September 1939. These pieces are also noticeable by the change in colour, as the bone china is more white compared to the cream colour of earthenware. This is incorrect, this backstamp with the copyright is seen on later pieces (1976-1987).

Introduced in 1934, Bunnykins tableware depicted Mr. Bunnykins and other rabbits dressed in human clothing, in colourful rural and small-town English scenes, transfer-printed on white china.

The earliest pieces, signed by Vernon, are quite rare and highly prized.

If anyone is serious about collecting bunnykins, you can't go past a good reference book such as the Charlton Standard Catalogue Royal Doulton Bunnykins by Jean Dale and Louse Irvine for a comprehensive list of patterns, backstamps, shapes and prices.

This book has been one source for my information here.

Bunnykins was originally designed by a nun sister Mary Barbara Vernon, and her name is seen on wares up until the mid 1950's.

After her, Waltar Hayward took over during the 1950's up until the mid 80's, adding many of his own designs. The following stamp is the first stamp dating 1937-53 featuring the bunnys under the royal doulton logo and the word "Bunnykins" below this.

Introduced in 1934, Bunnykins tableware depicted Mr. Bunnykins and other rabbits dressed in human clothing, in colorful rural and small-town English scenes, transfer-printed on white china.