At a time when they have an active infection on the genitalia, if they were to sit on a toilet seat that is used by others, it would be common courtesy to clean the toilet seat after use with either alcohol or soap and water on a clean cloth and then set the cloth aside to be laundered in a hot wash. One is the issue of transmitting herpes to the baby if the mother is having an outbreak during the birth.Doctors are very used to dealing with this situation, as long as they know about it.

If your partner develops symptoms, of course, then ask your partner to consult a dermatologist or urologist for a viral culture of one of the lesions for herpes simplex virus. Work is in progress on vaccines for both genital herpes and HPV, but they are a few years off.

The drug companies release occasional updates on the progress they are making, but a “cure” is not around the corner, unfortunately. Org Board member Terri Warren is deeply involved in clinical studies and research.

Remember that herpes CAN be transmitted even when the infected partner is not having symptoms. I would suggest that you start the process by locating your previous medical records to find out what type of herpes it is that you have in your genital tract. In some countries, type 1 herpes simplex causes herpes in as much as thirty percent of cases.

The best information to have would be a previous viral culture that revealed what type virus that causes your infection.

However, you should not hang your hat on one being released just yet.

You should focus on the “Smart Living” approach for managing herpes which is posted elsewhere on this site.

Standard office blood work may not be type specific and thus would not be the best information.

If it is, in fact, herpes simplex type 2 that causes your infection, then my suggestion is that you ask your partner to have the POCkit blood test for type 2 herpes simplex performed in the physician’s office.

This test is not available for type 1 herpes simplex, plus the majority of people are infected with type 1 already in the oral area.