It's called Finding Prince Charming, and Lance Bass will host.The premise of the show sounds very similar to The Bachelor, (a show that has only ever portrayed heterosexual relationships): 13 men will live together in one house and compete to find love with a man Logo is calling "the nation’s most eligible gay heartthrob." One contestant will be eliminated each week.

Finding Prince Charming is set to premiere this fall.

As the one of the cofounders of Tinder, 25-year-old Whitney Wolfe helped build the wildly popular dating app from the ground up.

Wolfe has described her strategy as "Sadie Hawkins-inspired," and just three months since its official launch, the Austin-based startup boasts more than a million matches, as well as a global network of ambassadors (cool girls enlisted to spread the "buzz" about Bumble). I wanted to start a social platform app that would encourage kindness among a younger demographic of women, more of the junior high or high school set.

Racked checked in with Wolfe from a Bumble retreat in rural Texas to discuss empowering users, dating confidence, and why she doesn’t plan to replace Tinder. It's such an impressionable age for girls, and it's a time they're likely to be affected negatively by bullying.

The original goal was to make something similar to Snapchat or Instagram where you could only talk to one another in kindness, whether it’s through emojis or pre-approved comments. Out of the blue I heard from Andrey Andreev, who is my partner at Bumble now.

He’s an entrepreneur who is the founder and CEO of a very powerful social network called Badoo. He wanted to know what I was up to after Tinder and changed my mind about a couple of things. He wanted me to explore getting back into the dating market.

Designed to solve female-specific dating app frustrations like "dead-end matches"—connections that rarely lead to conversations, let alone dates—Bumble requires women to make the first move.

If she doesn’t start the conversation within 24 hours, the match disappears.

We agreed to keep that in mind with this new project. That’s where the whole "girls speak first" aspect comes in. I’ll go out with groups of my friends and someone will see a cute guy across the room, or in the bar, or in the restaurant.

She’ll be like, "Oh, he’s so cute, I wish I could talk to him! The response on the other end has proven really interesting!

Height, for me, doesn’t feel like something I would ever want to put in.