New dating methods are invented all the time, however, most have practical limitations.

Tradition paleontological and biostratigraphic correlation methods are still perhaps the most common relative dating methods used by geologists.

More modern correlation technologies include use of marine stable isotope records, paleomagnetic dating, tephrachronology, geomorphological methods, sedimentation characteristics, and other geochemical and radiometric methods.

Though using similar methods, these two techniques differ in certain ways that will be discussed in this article.

As the name implies, relative dating can tell which of the two artifacts is older.

However, archeologists still require further information to find out the items that are oldest and those that are youngest in the order.

It is left for absolute dating to come up with the precise age of an artifact.

It is possible to tell the number of years ago a particular rock or archeological site had been formed.

Two broad categories of classification methods are relative dating and absolute dating.

Absolute dating, on the other hand is capable of telling the exact age of an item using carbon dating and many other techniques that were not there in earlier times.

Relative dating makes use of the common sense principle that in a deposition of layers.

It is clear then that absolute dating is based upon physical and chemical properties of artifacts that provide a clue regarding the true age.