In the 1920s diamonds were discovered at the mouth of the Orange River, and prospectors began moving there, establishing towns at Alexander Bay and Port Nolloth.

This accelerated the appropriation of traditional lands that had begun early in the colonial period.

The majority of the Nama people in Namibia today are therefore Christian while Nama Muslims make up a large percentage of the Namibia's Muslims. First the man has to discuss his intentions with his family.

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The early colonialists referred to them as Hottentots.

Their alternative historical name, "Namaqua", simply stems from the addition of the Khoekhoe language suffix "-qua/khwa", meaning "people" (found in the names of other Southern African nations like the Griqua) In 1991, a part of Namaqualand (home of the Nama and one of the last true wilderness areas of South Africa) was named the Richtersveld National Park.

After two centuries of assimilation into the Nama culture, many Oorlams today regard Khoikhoigowab (Damara/Nama) as their mother tongue, though others speak Afrikaans.

The distinction between Namas and Oorlams has gradually disappeared over time to an extent where they are today regarded as one ethnic group, despite their different backgrounds.

In general the Nama practice a policy of communal land ownership.

Music, poetry and story telling are very important in Nama culture and many stories have been passed down orally through the generations.

Under apartheid, remaining pastoralists were encouraged to abandon their traditional lifestyle in favour of village life.

The Nama originally lived around the Orange River in southern Namibia and northern South Africa.

The yard at the bride's living place is prepared prior to the future husband's family's arrival, animal hides are laid out in the corners for the different groups to sit down and discuss. If this is granted, the groom is interrogated about details of the bride, including the circumstances of their first meeting and how to identify her body marks to make sure both know each other well.

If the bride is pregnant or already has children from her future husband or someone else, the bride is subjected to the "door cleansing" ceremony (slaughtering and consuming a snow-white goat).

After several days the wedding ritual continues in reverse; the bride's family visits the clan of the groom.