It took data analyst, journalist, and relationship-seeker Amy Webb a few passes around the online dating world to realize that the one glaring problem with online dating sites like and e Harmony isn't that their questions are worded poorly or that their algorithms are bad.It's that people who use online dating sites — herself included — don't answer the questions honestly.

Webb tracked everything from the number of times a date made her high-five him to how often he made an awkward sexual remark. "It turns out that these probably weren't bad guys," she says in a TED talk.

"They were just bad for me." The reason they were bad for her wasn't because the websites' algorithms were off.

After filling in all of the questionnaire and getting a few responses, she ventured out to meet her first match. Once she arrived at the glamorous restaurant he'd picked out, he began making lewd jokes and ordering tons of food.

Then, just before the waiter dropped off the massive bill, the date left, never to be seen again. When the dates didn't improve, she started logging them in a spreadsheet, pulling out dozens of data points on her alleged "matches" in an attempt to discover what was going wrong.

This is the crux of the problem, says Webb: Smart algorithms getting skewed by not-quite-honest answers.

Unfortunately, Webb says, "very few of us have the ability to be totally and brutally honest with ourselves" As a result, we get "matches" that don't match us at all. In a recent study of undergrads, 60% of participants lied at least once during a 10-minute casual conversation with a stranger.

My postulation is that the expectation for relationships to “progress” is a little more urgent for those resorting to online dating. I’m exploring and researching this space a little more.

I’m intrigued by the rapid growth of some of these companies receiving millions of dollars in funding.

In fact, the algorithms "were doing exactly what they were designed to do," says Webb.

But in order for the algorithms to match up two people, both of them have to answer the questions on which they're based honestly.

In theory, it certainly cuts off a lot of the old school courtship practice, but not without compromise. A little grayscale and free transform and you can make any fat face blotchy skinned slob look classic, fit and refined. Suppose you’re a nice guy/girl that’s a hair less than stunningly beautiful. The other problem I see with online dating is that every person in inundated with selection, and naturally, everyone wants to sync up with the most attractive person they can. I submitted all my data to this website and the the algorithm hooked us up. Tinder has some potential for adventure, but that app is like taking the 1-10 rating scale and just going binary.