It can't float in mid-air, particularly if the material involved is sand, mud, or molten rock.

problems with radioisotope dating-16problems with radioisotope dating-89problems with radioisotope dating-58

Radiocarbon dating is one kind of radiometric dating, used for determining the age of organic remains that are less than 50,000 years old.

For inorganic matter and for older materials, isotopes of other elements, such as potassium, uranium, and strontium, are used.

An early summary of them is found in Charles Lyell's .

In no way are they meant to imply there are no exceptions.

The amount of the isotope in the object is compared to the amount of the isotope's decay products.

The object's approximate age can then be figured out using the known rate of decay of the isotope.They are applied by geologists in the same sense that a "null hypothesis" is in statistics -- not necessarily correct, just testable.In the last 200 or more years of their application, they are valid, but geologists do not assume they are.Geochronologists do not claim that radiometric dating is foolproof (no scientific method is), but it does work reliably for most samples.It is these highly consistent and reliable samples, rather than the tricky ones, that have to be falsified for "young Earth" theories to have any scientific plausibility, not to mention the need to falsify huge amounts of evidence from other techniques.The example used here contrasts sharply with the way conventional scientific dating methods are characterized by some critics (for example, refer to discussion in "Common Creationist Criticisms of Mainstream Dating Methods" in the Age of the Earth FAQ and Isochron Dating FAQ).