Welcome to the official State of Oklahoma Sex Offender Registry web site.

You may also register for the Community Notification system so that you can be notified by email when a registered sex offender moves into the specified radius of the address submitted. The Act applies to any person residing, working, or attending school within the state who has been convicted or received any probationary term for a sex crime in the state after November 1, 1989, or has entered the state after November 1, 1989, having previously been convicted or received any probationary term for a sex crime.

The Oklahoma Sex Offender Registry, maintained by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, provides public information on sex offenders required to register pursuant to the Sex Offenders Registration Act, 57 O. State law designates certain sex offenders as habitual (two or more sex crime convictions) or aggravated (convicted of the most serious kinds of sex offenses), and based on federal law all sex offenders are assigned to one of three levels.

Please allow a reasonable time for this review as there are currently more than 7,000 offenders on the Oklahoma Sex Offender Registry and each one must be reviewed individually.

If you thought sleeping with someone before a first date was a no-go, but texting during a date was OK, think again.

While the rule of thumb may have been wait to have sex until a third date, 34% of singles have had sex before a first date, and Millennials are 48% more likely to have sex before a first date than all other generations of singles, according to the annual Singles in America survey, funded by Dallas-based dating service Match and conducted by Research Now.

Millennials especially are unencumbered by fears that may have held people back from having sex in the past, says Helen Fisher a biological anthropologist and chief scientific adviser to Match, who helped develop the representative survey of more than 5,000 singles.“We have a real misunderstanding of Millennials,” she said.

Vandalism, verbal or written threats of harm are illegal and will result in arrest and prosecution.

On June 25, 2013, the Oklahoma Supreme Court entered an Order in Starkey v.

Level 1 offenders are required to register for fifteen years following expiration of their sentence.