DVCAM uses standard DV encoding, which runs at 25 Mbit/s, and is compatible with most editing systems.Some camcorders that allow DVCAM recording can record progressive-scan video.MPEG HD422 doubles the chroma horizontal resolution compared to the previous generations of high-definition video XDCAM formats.

The XDCAM range includes cameras and decks which act as drop-in replacements for traditional VTRs allowing XDCAM discs to be used within a traditional videotape-based workflow.

These decks can also serve as random access computer hard drives for easy import of the video data files into non-linear editing systems (NLE) via Fire Wire (IEEE 1394) and Ethernet.

Tapeless camcorders that record onto solid-state memory cards, use MP4 container for high definition audio/video, and DV-AVI container for DV video.

JVC camcorders that use XDCAM EX recording format, are also capable of recording into Quick Time container besides using MP4 container.

This unit is designed to have the same performance as the Sx S Pro card however its life expectancy is shorter at an estimated 5 years of life when used every day to the card's full capacity. These have a 1.2 Gbit/s read and write speed to support the PMW-F55 in storing 4K 60p acquisition.

Sx S (S-by-S) is a flash memory standard compliant to the Sony and San Disk-created Express Card standard.

None of the later products have made earlier product lines obsolete.

Sony maintains that different formats within XDCAM family have been designed to meet different applications and budget constraints.

MPEG IMX allows recording in standard definition, using MPEG-2 encoding at data rate of 30, 40 or 50 megabits per second.

Unlike most other MPEG-2 implementations, IMX uses intraframe compression with each frame having the same exact size in bytes to simplify recording onto video tape.

In 2008, Sony introduced a new recording medium to their XDCAM range – Sx S Pro (pronounced "S-by-S").