I don’t have anything against snowboarders, personality-wise.

They just don’t align with my own goals in the mountains, which lean toward touring and backcountry skiing.

Later, when I almost went down on a run but saved it at the last minute, he yelled across the slope, “Nice job, Alabama!

The basic gist: I show up and pin a ribbon indicating my age group (18 to 35) to my jacket, and an event organizer matches me with someone in my age bracket.

Then my date and I head off to ride the lifts together and ski any runs we choose.

I thanked him for the fun time and mumbled something about getting another match.

He didn’t seem offended and suggested we meet up for a drink later.

When I told him so, he seemed a little taken aback but not crushed.

We had a connection, but age, religion, and hobbies are weighted more heavily on my figurative pro-con list.

Sitting in Saturday-morning ski traffic on I-70 the day of the event, I was hopeful about getting back into the outdoor dating scene but worried that my dates would leave me in a spray of snow.

I’m a pretty cautious skier, and I figured everyone there would be shredding.

Still, he was a good bit younger, only skied downhill at resorts, and was pretty religious (all cons in my book).

At the end of a long ski run, I would have kept riding with him, but there was still the possibility of meeting someone even better.

If I was going to get through a whirlwind day of dating on the chairlift, I’d need to stay faithful to at least a few nonnegotiables.