Mark Caro of the Chicago Tribune wrote that "with his big, round, soulful eyes, Maguire always has been able to convey a sense of wonder, and his instinct for understatement also serves him well here." Due to script and production complications, a proposed fourth Spider-Man movie did not materialize.

Sony has rebooted the franchise, and has focused on a younger Spider-Man (played by Andrew Garfield) as Peter Parker is still in high school in the movie; Garfield has a more youthful appearance than Maguire.

He was nominated for the Screen Actors Guild and Golden Globe Awards, and received two Saturn Awards, including one for Best Actor.

He plays one of Lucas Barton's goons (one of three competitors at a video game competition) and had no lines.

He worked as a child actor in the early 1990s, often playing roles much younger than his chronological age, and as late as 2002 he was still playing teenagers while in his mid-20s.

Here he played the son of a unionist German immigrant who joins his southern friends in the Missouri riders, avenging the atrocities committed against Missourians by Kansas Jayhawkers and redleggers.

In 2002, Maguire starred in Spider-Man, based on the popular Marvel Comics superhero.

Di Caprio was cast, and Maguire later got a guest role at least partly on Di Caprio's recommendation.

The same scenario played itself out during casting for the 1993 movie This Boy's Life (featuring Robert De Niro as the lead); Di Caprio got the main teen role (coincidentally, the character was named "Toby") and Maguire got a part as one of Toby's friends.

In 2006, he starred in his first villainous role as Corporal Patrick Tully opposite George Clooney and Cate Blanchett in Steven Soderbergh's The Good German, based on the Joseph Kanon novel of the same name.

monk with his eye on Father O'Malley (Kirk Lazarus, the character played by Robert Downey, Jr.

in Tropic Thunder) in the faux trailer for Satan's Alley.